College Scholarships

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Information About College Scholarship:

We are here to guide you and educate you on what all is involved when pursuing a college scholarship.  Listed below are a series of entry level and basic steps and guide lines to direct you in the right direction to achieving your scholarship funds.

 

What kinds of scholarships are available?

Some scholarships for college are merit-based. You earn them by meeting or exceeding certain standards set by the scholarship-giver. Merit scholarships might be awarded based on academic achievement or on a combination of academics and a special talent, trait, or interest. Other scholarships are based on financial need.

Many scholarships are geared toward particular groups of people; for instance, there are scholarships for women or high school seniors. And some are available because of where you or your parent work, or because you come from a certain background (for instance, there are scholarships for military families.

A scholarship might cover the entire cost of your tuition, or it might be a one-time award of a few hundred dollars. Either way, it’s worth applying for, because it’ll help reduce the cost of your education.

 

How do I find scholarships?

You can learn about scholarships in several ways, including contacting the financial aid office at the school you plan to attend and checking information in a public library or online. But be careful. Make sure scholarship information and offers you receive are legitimate; and remember that you don't have to pay to find scholarships or other financial aid. 

Try these free sources of information about scholarships:

  • the financial aid office at a college or career school
  • a high school or TRIO counselor
  • the U.S. Department of Labor’s FREE scholarship search tool
  • federal agencies
  • your state grant agency
  • your library’s reference section
  • foundations, religious or community organizations, local businesses, or civic groups
  • organizations (including professional associations) related to your field of interest
  • ethnicity-based organizations
  • your employer or your parents’ employers

 

 

When do I apply for scholarships?

That depends on each scholarship’s deadline. Some deadlines are as early as a year before college starts, so if you’re in high school now, you should be researching and applying for scholarships during the summer between your junior and senior years. But if you’ve missed that window, don’t give up! Look at scholarship information to see which ones you can still apply for now.

 

How do I apply for scholarships?

Each scholarship has its own requirements. The scholarship’s website should give you an idea of who qualifies for the scholarship and how to apply. Make sure you read the application carefully, fill it out completely, and meet the application deadline.  

 

How do I get my scholarship money?

That depends on the scholarship. The money might go directly to your college, where it will be applied to any tuition, fees, or other amounts you owe, and then any leftover funds given to you. Or it might be sent directly to you in a check. The scholarship provider should tell you what to expect when it informs you that you’ve been awarded the scholarship. If not, make sure to ask.

 

 

How does a scholarship affect my other student aid?

A scholarship will affect your other student aid because all your student aid added together can’t be more than your cost of attendance at your college or career school. So, you’ll need to let your school know if you’ve been awarded a scholarship so that the financial aid office can subtract that amount from your cost of attendance (and from certain other aid, such as loans, that you might have been offered). Then, any amount left can be covered by other financial aid for which you’re eligible. Questions? Ask your financial aid office.

How to Apply for a Scholarship

Applying for scholarships is a lot like applying to colleges. You start with a large number of possibilities and cut that down to a short list of choices. Then you have to complete and submit applications that include essays, recommendations and lists of achievements that highlight your best qualities.

You may hear various suggestions about the best way to apply for scholarships. The truth is, what works for one person may not work for another. There are no secrets to applying. The best advice is to use common sense and follow directions.

Don’t Miss Deadlines

Some scholarships have deadlines early in the fall of senior year. Mark the due dates on your calendar and work your way backward to figure out how much time you’ll have to get each piece of the application finished.

Read Eligibility Requirements Carefully

If you have a question about whether you qualify for a certain scholarship, contact the scholarship sponsor. There’s no point in applying for a scholarship you’re not eligible to receive.

Get Organized

Make a separate file for each scholarship and sort the files by application due dates.You should also gather the items you’ll need to apply. Many scholarships ask you to send some or all of the following:

  • High school transcript
  • Standardized test scores
  • Financial aid forms, such as the FAFSA or CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE®
  • Parents' financial information, including tax returns
  • One or more essays
  • One or more letters of recommendation
  • Proof of eligibility for the scholarship (for example, proof of membership in a certain group)

You might also need to prepare for an interview. And if you’re competing for talent-based scholarships, you’ll probably need to audition or submit a portfolio.

Follow Instructions

Stick to the word limit for the essay. If supporting materials are not requested in the application, don’t send them.

Use common sense, start early and follow directions.

Check Your Application

Before you send the application in:

  • Make sure you filled in all the blanks. You can contact scholarship sponsors if you aren't sure how to fill out part of the application.
  • Make sure your answers are readable. If you can, fill out the application online. If you have to write out the application, print neatly.
  • If you're reusing material (such as a cover letter or an essay) from another scholarship application, make sure you haven't left in any incorrect names.
  • Proofread your application. Run spell check and grammar check on the application. Also, have someone else read your essays to catch mistakes and give you feedback.
  • Remember to sign and date your application.

Keep Copies of Everything

Having copies of your scholarship application makes it easy to resend quickly if application materials get lost in the mail. If you’re applying for a scholarship online, save copies of your work on your computer.

Track the Package

If you’re submitting your application by mail, consider using certified mail or requesting a return receipt to confirm that your materials arrived at their destination.

 

Website – steps for finding a scholarship

http://www.ecampustours.com/for-students/paying-for-college/scholarships-grants/steps-for-getting-a-college-scholarship.aspx#.VT1_Uk3D_rc

 

Website – ultimate guide to college scholarships 

http://www.thesimpledollar.com/college-scholarship-guide/

Website – Scholarship Search Databases 

http://www.ugeducation.ucla.edu/src/scholarship_search.html

Website – scholarships 

http://grantspace.org/tools/knowledge-base/Funding-Resources/Individual-Donors/scholarship-funds

Website – scholarships 

http://www.pointfoundation.org/

Financial assistance for youth (high school, college students & new college graduates – see websites and videos below.

https://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/foreducators/lesson_plans/highschool.php

http://www.ecampustours.com/for-students/college-planning/outside-the-classroom/five-basic-personal-finance-lessons-every-high-sch.aspx#.VUrEmU3D9Zc

 

Finding a scholarship

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xz4cBmrZ5DMhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbM73_2bIUs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d667QMk9m2s

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